Build, Run, & Continuously Deploy Docker Containers to Azure App Service

Build, Run, & Continuously Deploy Docker Containers to Azure App Service



If you’re thinking about investing your time to pick up new skills, you can’t go wrong with learning how to build, run, and manage containers.

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Build, Run, and Continuously Deploy Docker Containers on Azure App Service:

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28 thoughts on “Build, Run, & Continuously Deploy Docker Containers to Azure App Service

  1. Great tutorial. Can you show the same setup using docker compose ? Or provide a link for some documentation ?

  2. This video is the perfect example for any trainer to how to share MAXIMUM knowledge in MINIMUM time!
    Awesome work!

  3. Thanks for the démo, I have an error while pushing the image, it says "Access to ressources denied", while the connection had succeded

  4. Hi, good video. I've been working with containers and App Services for not a very long time and I have truly enjoyed it; however, I have lately been facing something that got me stuck. I got a project with Gitlab pipelines that pushes the image to the Azure container registry and in my Dockerfile I use some ARGs variables that should be grabbed from the environment variables I have set up in Azure.
    I tried with docker-compose using this idea but didn't work. I like more the idea of working directly with the image than using the docker-compose
    version: "3.6"
    services:
    app:
    image: simpledem.azurecr.io/simple:latest
    build:
    args:
    – SSH_PORT=${SSH_PORT}

  5. what wrong when i do docker push again to CD it dosent work i tried many time i dont know whats happenning please someone helps me?

  6. Great demo. I'm now working with port settings on my containers and it seems that for some reason, my docker container prefers to expose port 80 out of the box? For instance, if I want to run an app on port 5000 on my local machine, I must ALWAYS map to the docker container's port 80 like so "docker run -d -p 5000:80 –name myapp myapp". Is there a reason for this? I tried using "EXPOSE 5000" inside my dockerfile so I could run "docker run -d -p 5000:5000" but it doesn't work. Any advice would be appreciated. . .thank you!

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