Deploying serverless Node.js microservices (Google I/O '18)

Deploying serverless Node.js microservices (Google I/O '18)



This session will cover how to deploy a set of Node.js microservices quickly and scale from 0 – 1000 in seconds. With this stack you can rely on Google Cloud for the operations and focus on the code to create optimal, performant, and reliable experiences for your users.

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Google App Engine →
Google Cloud Functions →
Demo sample →

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13 thoughts on “Deploying serverless Node.js microservices (Google I/O '18)

  1. The "Task Scheduler" and the "Frontend" are accessing the same database. From my understanding there should be a Task Service that stores the tasks and then the "Task Scheduler" and the "Frontend" should only access the data through that service, right?

  2. Mixing Serverless and App engine in the same demo is quite confusing. As if all the cloud buzzwords were not confusing enough. If we go to Google's product page, they mention "Cloud functions" as in Beta and also do not suggest it for Web apps /APIs. In the demo, APP engine is portrayed as not having to decide infrastructure. However, it appears we have to choose the infrastructure for App engine.

  3. At time 32:11 the speaker says that Cloud Functions can be triggered based on a log entry. However, this is not present anywhere in the documentation – https://cloud.google.com/functions/docs/concepts/events-triggers. Not even in Firebase Cloud Functions – https://firebase.google.com/docs/functions/firestore-events. I need this feature for the application I am working on. Can you please point me to the documentation for the same?

  4. How about python? Node.js isn't that useful. Why has both Amazon and Microsoft support python, node.js, .net, and Google's own GO language while Google functions support one language. I would love to advocate for Google cloud services but it's difficult when it's services are so annoyingly half implemented.

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