John Scofield - How To Mix Bebop And Pentatonics

John Scofield – How To Mix Bebop And Pentatonics



John Scofield is in many ways a fantastic jazz artist. Besides having a signature tone and always coming up with new projects and collaborations he also has a very personal melodic language. In this John Scofield Lesson, I am going to break down some phrases from his solo on Not You Again. This is a song based on the changes of There Will Never Be Another You. Analyzing John Scofield licks really demonstrates how he uses pentatonic scales, melodic minor and mixes this with bebop influences.

John Scofield has a great very practical way to use legato in his playing. In many ways, it is a pretty fantastic way to use a technique that makes it easier to play the lines in a way that makes the phrasing more interesting. The solo is also a great example of how half of playing a good solo on a jazz standard is about interpreting and re-harmonizing the standard chords while playing.

What I don’t talk about in this lesson, even if it is as interesting as the notes he plays, is how John Scofield works with tone and shapes the sound of what he plays. This aspect of his playing is not that common in Jazz Guitar, but the dynamic and tonal range of John Scofield could easily be the topic of long books.

The song, Not You Again, is off the album John Scofield recorded with Billy Higgins, Kenny Garrett, Christian McBride, and Brad Mehldau. The Brad Mehldau solo is also worth studying as he is also a master at re-interpreting the harmony. This is also the first album that Scofield recorded without using his signature chorus.

Content:
0:00 Intro – Scofield on a Jazz Standard
0:55 #1 Diatonic Pentatonic Scale
1:49 Linking Technique and Phrasing Dynamics
2:10 #1 Diatonic Pentatonic Scale – Slow
2:14 #2 Bebop Line and Phrasing
2:58 Using Legato to help add Large Intervals to the solo
4:18 #2 Bebop Line and Phrasing – Slow
4:27 Analysis of Scofields Legato and Phrasing
5.07 Keeping it Practical like Allan Holdsworth
5:14 #3 Altered Scale Pentatonic
5:43 Altered Pentatonic Melodic Patterns
6:16 Groups of 7 8th notes
6:31 #3 Altered Scale Pentatonic – Slow
7:00 #4 Angular Legato lines
7:51 Legato to create Angular lines
8:24 #4 Angular Legato lines – Slow
8:27 #5 Rhythmic and Octave Displacement
8:50 Rhythmic Displacement with pentatonc scales
9:26 #5 Rhythmic and Octave Displacement – Slow
9:31 #6 Pentatonic & Bebop melodies
10:33 Legato: Hammer on/Pull off and Slides
10:58 #6 Pentatonic & Bebop melodies – Slow
11:04 Like the video? Check out my Patreon Page!

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Edited by Luciano Poli

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25 thoughts on “John Scofield – How To Mix Bebop And Pentatonics

  1. I think it is always very interesting how somebody interprets a standard like this! Do you guys have any suggestions?

    Content:
    0:00 Intro – Scofield on a Jazz Standard
    0:55 #1 Diatonic Pentatonic Scale
    1:49 Linking Technique and Phrasing Dynamics
    2:10 #1 Diatonic Pentatonic Scale – Slow
    2:14 #2 Bebop Line and Phrasing
    2:58 Using Legato to help add Large Intervals to the solo
    4:18 #2 Bebop Line and Phrasing – Slow
    4:27 Analysis of Scofield's Legato and Phrasing
    5.07 Keeping it Practical like Allan Holdsworth
    5:14 #3 Altered Scale Pentatonic
    5:43 Altered Pentatonic Melodic Patterns
    6:16 Groups of 7 8th notes
    6:31 #3 Altered Scale Pentatonic – Slow
    7:00 #4 Angular Legato lines
    7:51 Legato to create Angular lines
    8:24 #4 Angular Legato lines – Slow
    8:27 #5 Rhythmic and Octave Displacement
    8:50 Rhythmic Displacement with pentatonic scales
    9:26 #5 Rhythmic and Octave Displacement – Slow
    9:31 #6 Pentatonic & Bebop melodies
    10:33 Legato: Hammer on/Pull off and Slides
    10:58 #6 Pentatonic & Bebop melodies – Slow
    11:04 Like the video? Check out my Patreon Page!

  2. As you know I do always love the lessons where you analize -Scofield, Mike Stern, Julian Lage, Pat Metheny 🙂

  3. Hey Jens, I've seen an interview with J.S. where he said the lack of his technical skills to play really fast made him develop his legato playing…limiting forces one to search for solutions. Always great content from you. Thanx a lot.

  4. Thank you for that video!
    I think Scofield is a great example of a modern jazz guitarist, he is influenced by much more than only the traditional, typical jazz-elements, because he also mixes up a lot of blues and rock elements in a very interesting way 🙂

  5. Thanks Jens. Its always illuminating how u give us tricks on how to attain large intervals through these examples.

  6. One of my favorites ! You could do a similar lesson as regards Scott Henderson and hos own pentatonic stuff

  7. Love schofield and your lesson! Check out my videos Jens and tell me what do you think, I learned from you a lot . Thanks

  8. Sco's relentless off beat phrasing is what sets him apart from most other jazz guitar players for me. Great lesson. Thanks lars!

  9. I saw him live last night (even talked to him for a few seconds!), really motivated to dig a bit deeper into his concepts and today I see this video from you. Afraid of your mindreading powers or grateful? Rather grateful. Thanks a lot!

  10. i just worked through the jazz standards video from last week, so this is a great follow up since its over the same changes. Another great lesson Jens.

  11. Another great video Jens, many thanks. My all time favourite is 'My Foolish Heart'. John's live version of this tune is utterly beautiful. I'm halfway through transcribing it 🙂

  12. You had me at Schofield… I've always thought (wondered) his playing was "stretched out". I like your description of "angular". As always, Thank You!

  13. I’d like to see you play it up to tempo when you play the examples at the end, it gives more context than just playing it slow and moving on to the next idea, just my opinion…love your videos though, I watch all the time 😃

  14. Incredible video.
    Can you make a video on bebop vocabulary? If you weren't planning a video like that can you suggest a pace to start with learnig bebop licks?

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